Which gland produces testosterone

All very interesting. I just became aware of this Pineal Gland study. I am a certified hypnotherapist and was surfing . I am commenting on Mr. Wolfe’s statement about Dr. Adkins clogged heart untimely death . Dr. Adkins died from a traumatic cranial head injury to the back of his head when he slipped on the ice while walking to work one winter morning as he did every morning. He held onto life for three weeks. A remarkable feat for a man of his late 70’s. His autopsy stated he had a perfectly clear circulatory system which surely helped him to hold on as long as he did. As Dave also stated, don’t listen to rumors of other people. I agree. On the Adkins diet… Read the Book! I have turned many people onto this Diet and it has helped everyone of them. But as I always tell them first…don’t get on the Diet until you first Read the Book! Not part of it.. but the whole thing(my 300 pound Doctor even argued with me about the diet. Did you read the whole book I would say?..no just parts of it he would reply. Read the whole book!). If you found the government involvement of the Pineal Gland interesting, you’ll enjoy Atkins book as well. As for me…I’m surfing for more of Mr. Wolfe’s good stuff. God Bless. Out Here

Conn's syndrome, also known as primary hyperaldosteronism, is a rare condition in which the body produces excessive levels of the hormone aldosterone, which is responsible for regulating sodium and potassium levels in the blood. Causes of this condition include tumors affecting the adrenal gland(s) or hereditary factors. Symptoms of Conn's syndrome may include hypertension, hypokalemia (low levels of potassium in the blood), hypernatremia (excessive levels of sodium in the blood), hyperkaluria (excessive levels of potassium in the urine), and high levels of alkalinity.

A girl's gonads, the ovaries (pronounced: OH-vuh-reez), are located in her pelvis. They produce eggs and secrete the female hormones estrogen (pronounced: ESS-truh-jen) and progesterone (pronounced: pro-JESS-tuh-rone). Estrogen is involved when a girl begins to go through puberty. During puberty, a girl will experience breast growth, will begin to accumulate body fat around the hips and thighs, and will have a growth spurt. Estrogen and progesterone are also involved in the regulation of a girl's menstrual cycle. These hormones also play a role in pregnancy.

Thymus
The thymus is a soft, triangular-shaped organ found in the chest posterior to the sternum. The thymus produces hormones called thymosins that help to train and develop T-lymphocytes during fetal development and childhood. The T-lymphocytes produced in the thymus go on to protect the body from pathogens throughout a person’s entire life. The thymus becomes inactive during puberty and is slowly replaced by adipose tissue throughout a person’s life.

Other Hormone Producing Organs
In addition to the glands of the endocrine system, many other non-glandular organs and tissues in the body produce hormones as well.  

These disorders can occur if there is a problem with the adrenal gland itself, such as a disease, genetic mutation, tumor, or infection. Or, sometimes the disorder results from a problem in another gland, such as the pituitary, which helps to regulate the adrenal gland. In addition, some medications can cause problems with how the adrenal glands function. When the adrenal glands produce too little or too many hormones, or when too many hormones come into the body from an outside source, serious health problems can develop. 2 , 3

International Adrenal Cortex Conference “Adrenal 2010” Wednesday, June 16, 2010 - Friday, June 18, 2010
Location: San Diego, California Description: This conference provided a forum for both new and established investigators to present their most recent work, highlighting new findings relevant to adrenal physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology, genetics, and medicine. It was anticipated that these discoveries would provide a framework for further understanding of the function of the adrenal gland and its contributions to health and disease.

Which gland produces testosterone

which gland produces testosterone

Thymus
The thymus is a soft, triangular-shaped organ found in the chest posterior to the sternum. The thymus produces hormones called thymosins that help to train and develop T-lymphocytes during fetal development and childhood. The T-lymphocytes produced in the thymus go on to protect the body from pathogens throughout a person’s entire life. The thymus becomes inactive during puberty and is slowly replaced by adipose tissue throughout a person’s life.

Other Hormone Producing Organs
In addition to the glands of the endocrine system, many other non-glandular organs and tissues in the body produce hormones as well.  

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